Satire – The Definitive Guide to Satire: Etymology, History & Lore

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Image taken from page 9 of 'The House that Jack built ... With twelve cuts. [A satire in verse on the sale of gin and beer.]'The British Library

Image taken from page 9 of ‘The House that Jack built … With twelve cuts. [A satire in verse on the sale of gin and beer.]’
The British Library via Flickr.

By Chaos_Dynamics

Via Sarcasm Society

Satire is an indirect form of critique, in that it mocks or attacks an individual or idea by proxy. Satirical speech and literature is generally used to observe and judge the “evils” or morally questionable ideals held by individuals, groups and sometimes entire cultures. The attack itself is derived from what is known as the satirist’s social motive–these critiques illustrate what the satirist, within the context of their own world view, believes is “right” based upon what they ridicule as “wrong”. Jean Weisgerber’s Satire and Irony a Means of Communication states, “Satire is manifestly directed to people. It involves the victim it attacks and the public it tries to persuade, it restores to language…

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